Fuck yeah, melancholy...

Recognize these guys? They’re some of the wealthiest people in America according to Forbes.

Tell me again how Bruce Wayne would be instantly recognized at the end of The Dark Knight Rises?

And yes, I know he’s a playboy, but we’re never given any indication that he’s a big deal outside of Gotham, much less the States. In both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight, he travels to foreign countries and no one recognizes him except for Ducard, which actually surprises Bruce. And of course, in TDKR, he’s been in hiding for seven years and sabotages attempts to photograph him.

So the question now is, how many of Forbes’ Richest 100 could you recognize from seven years ago?

You guys, I think… Bruce Wayne might be Bane!

You guys, I think… Bruce Wayne might be Bane!

Why Batman fans hate TDKR’s ending

Article! Read this thing!

I just find it weird how TDKR is deconstructing the entire idea of Batman going out in a blaze of glory because the only way his war on crime can end is with his death, and yet instead of praising this reversal of expectations and broadening view of the character, a lot of fans are attacking it. And this after people attacked The Dark Knight for having a small (but significant) character arc for Bruce. 

What exactly would Bruce’s arc be if the movie were to end in his death? That he has to be willing to sacrifice his life for the greater good? Doesn’t Bruce already know that? Does anyone believe he wouldn’t have given his life to stop Ra’s al Ghul in the first movie? That if it weren’t for two and a half hours of character-building in TDKR, he’d run like a craven coward instead of dying?

"Batman, the only way to save the city is for you to defuse the nuke. You’ll be exposed to lethal radiation, but millions of lives will be saved." "Fuck that, I’m outta here!"

You’re retired? Screw you, I’m having fun and stealing stuff!
My sister’s response to Bruce Wayne’s companionship at the end of TDKR, if she were Catwoman.
No, if you want to continue the Dark Knight trilogy, here’s how you do it.

None of this “Bruce Wayne goes back to being Batman”/”John Blake joins the JLA” shit. No. There’s only one place to go when all the plot threads have been resolved and everything has gotten closure.

A romantic comedy.

Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) and Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway) are enjoying a quiet life in Italy when a home invasion prompts Bruce to buy a guard dog, Ace. But this dog is a menace! Will Selina put up with dug-up gardens and chased kittens, or will Bruce be in the doghouse?

THEN: Alfred Pennyworth (Michael Caine) loves giving Bruce advice about his relationship. But when he and Leslie Tompkins (Meryl Streep) are held up in the same bank robbery, he’ll find out he doesn’t know everything about love. He’s spent decades serving the Wayne family, but what can he do when it’s his heart giving the orders?

THEN: Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman) spends every working hour at Wayne Enterprises, but when a sleek young ad executive (Leonardo DiCaprio) starts climbing the corporate ladder, Lucius finds himself taking a more than professional interest. Can he admit to himself that there’s a reason he’s married to his job, and is it time for a divorce?

THEN: Ra’s Al Ghul (Liam Neeson) loves his daughter Talia (Marion Cotillard), but when she brings home a six foot seven mercenary, he excommunicates poor Bane (Tom Hardy). He just wants what’s best for his daughter, but she won’t even talk to him. After his car breaks down, who should give him a ride but Bane? Is one long drive enough time for the League of Shadows to come together… and form a family?

GOTHAM ACTUALLY

Sometimes what Gotham really needs… is love.

So as every Batfan knows, pearls are the symbol of the murder of Bruce Wayne’s parents. They’re a repeated image in two Batman classics, The Dark Knight Returns and Batman: Year One, where Martha Wayne’s shooting results in her pearl necklace breaking and scattering across the ground. They show up in Batman Begins, given an especial emphasis by having Bruce remembering his father actually giving them to Martha.
So far, so good, right? Then we come to The Dark Knight Rises and Nolan actually does something new with the most famous iconography in comics. Selina Kyle, breaking into Wayne Manor and incidentally kickstarting Bruce Wayne back towards the suit, swipes the pearls while she’s getting his fingerprints. Bruce confronts her about it and says he can’t let her take them. As you might expect, he doesn’t really mind that someone’s stealing from him—it’s more that they’re his mothers’ pearls. But still, he’s not outraged either. He’s frosty. Cordial. The pearls don’t mean anything to him, not anymore, they’re something he’s irrationally holding onto. Deadweight.
The rest of the movie, we have characters telling Bruce about his deathwish, how he doesn’t have to keep being Batman, how he can have a happy life, but it isn’t until the finale that he truly accepts this. And the pearls are a perfect visual metaphor of that. While faking his death, Bruce takes the time to grab them—not for himself, but as a gift for Selina. 
I’ve noticed some people asking what the point was of Catwoman in TDKR, since most of what her character did could’ve been accomplished by other characters in an admittedly overfull movie. But even though she was an engaging, entertaining character in her own right, her real importance to the story is in symbolism. If Bruce just faked his death and ran off to Italy, we’d have no way of knowing he wouldn’t become a hermit again or even be drawn into becoming Batman once more.
By showing him with Selina, we can see he’s taken the film’s lesson to heart. It’s not just that he lets go of the pearls, it’s that he gives them to Selina. He’s moving on. He’s releasing both the stigma of his parents’ murder and the fantasy of a romance with Rachel, something that never would’ve worked, something that was proven to be impossible; and proven again with Miranda Tate, a seemingly-similar character to Rachel, idealistic and comforting, but now twisted into a deathly apparition.
Selina is someone who can understand what he’s been through, because she’s been there herself. The idea of a lover as saintly redeemer is gone. Selina is Bruce’s partner and equal, as reiterated throughout the movie in both action and dialogue. And in the end, the pearls that were originally intended by Thomas Wayne as a gift for his wife come full circle. They’re not a symbol of death anymore. They’re not deadweight anymore. In giving them to Selina, Bruce once more gives them meaning. They are, again, a token of affection.

So as every Batfan knows, pearls are the symbol of the murder of Bruce Wayne’s parents. They’re a repeated image in two Batman classics, The Dark Knight Returns and Batman: Year One, where Martha Wayne’s shooting results in her pearl necklace breaking and scattering across the ground. They show up in Batman Begins, given an especial emphasis by having Bruce remembering his father actually giving them to Martha.

So far, so good, right? Then we come to The Dark Knight Rises and Nolan actually does something new with the most famous iconography in comics. Selina Kyle, breaking into Wayne Manor and incidentally kickstarting Bruce Wayne back towards the suit, swipes the pearls while she’s getting his fingerprints. Bruce confronts her about it and says he can’t let her take them. As you might expect, he doesn’t really mind that someone’s stealing from him—it’s more that they’re his mothers’ pearls. But still, he’s not outraged either. He’s frosty. Cordial. The pearls don’t mean anything to him, not anymore, they’re something he’s irrationally holding onto. Deadweight.

The rest of the movie, we have characters telling Bruce about his deathwish, how he doesn’t have to keep being Batman, how he can have a happy life, but it isn’t until the finale that he truly accepts this. And the pearls are a perfect visual metaphor of that. While faking his death, Bruce takes the time to grab them—not for himself, but as a gift for Selina. 

I’ve noticed some people asking what the point was of Catwoman in TDKR, since most of what her character did could’ve been accomplished by other characters in an admittedly overfull movie. But even though she was an engaging, entertaining character in her own right, her real importance to the story is in symbolism. If Bruce just faked his death and ran off to Italy, we’d have no way of knowing he wouldn’t become a hermit again or even be drawn into becoming Batman once more.

By showing him with Selina, we can see he’s taken the film’s lesson to heart. It’s not just that he lets go of the pearls, it’s that he gives them to Selina. He’s moving on. He’s releasing both the stigma of his parents’ murder and the fantasy of a romance with Rachel, something that never would’ve worked, something that was proven to be impossible; and proven again with Miranda Tate, a seemingly-similar character to Rachel, idealistic and comforting, but now twisted into a deathly apparition.

Selina is someone who can understand what he’s been through, because she’s been there herself. The idea of a lover as saintly redeemer is gone. Selina is Bruce’s partner and equal, as reiterated throughout the movie in both action and dialogue. And in the end, the pearls that were originally intended by Thomas Wayne as a gift for his wife come full circle. They’re not a symbol of death anymore. They’re not deadweight anymore. In giving them to Selina, Bruce once more gives them meaning. They are, again, a token of affection.

Spoilers for TDKR
Occupy Crime Alley

So with the release of TDKR, a lot of people are looking at the plot point of Bane raising an army of Gotham’s malcontents and the police heroically fighting them, and then declaring that it’s an attack on the Occupy movement and Christopher Nolan is a fascist. And you’re welcome to think that, but I’ll think you’re dumb and hope you fall in a hole.

SPOILERS.

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